Killing Game Radio

Eugene Ionesco's Killing Game is the comic tale of a plague-ridden town. Ionesco is less concerned with death itself than what happens to human beings in a society that perceives itself under threat. He is exploring how easily human freedoms are compromised and manipulated by fear. Killing Game Radio is an interactive object that should be experienced in the lobby of a theatre during a production of Killing Game. Based on frequencies found on the AM dial in 1953 Dallas, Texas, this radio works and sounds just like a normal radio. There are various kinds of stations to choose from. Mixed among sounds one might have heard in 1953 in North Texas—pop music, tejano, country, jazz—there are other curated stations which carry a sense of death and darkness. Every song is at the height of an emotion—happy, sad, exultant, remorseful. Within the 30 minute loop there are news reports of the plague sweeping the nation. In the Absurdist tradition, none of the news reports provide useful information. Just when they are about to tell you how to remain safe or where the virus has spread, static takes over and renders the information useless. What would you do if a plague were coming? How would you react? What if you could get no real information? How will your freedoms be compromised and manipulated by fear? By inviting the audience to consider these questions before and after, inside and outside the auditorium, we can enhance their experience of the play.

Killing Game Radio
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